Jul 5, 2012

Review: Gray Rainbow Journey


Gray Rainbow Journey
Gray Rainbow Journey by K.B. Schaller

My rating: 5 of 5 stars




Gray Rainbow Journey
by K.B. Schaller


My review is after the book description. Lisa

ALSO PLEASE CHECK OUT MY GIVEAWAY: A signed copy of the book from the author. at http://MoonShineArtSpot.blogspot.com July 6-12

A unique coming-of-age novel about the stunning consequences of choices, presented through Native eyes by a member of the Cherokee Confederacy. Torn between two worlds, Dina Youngblood must make a choice...if it doesn't kill her first.

Cheha Youngblood disappeared without a trace from the Bitterroot Confederacy three months ago, and her older daughter, Dina, is determined to find out why. What do the clues in her mother's journal mean? Who is the giant-winged creature that so terrified her mother, a Native Christian convert? Could any of the tales that are as old as the Indian nations and told in the blackness of deep nights in the South Florida Everglades be true? And why are owls beginning to perch outside of Dina's home?

Then handsome Marty Osceola, the son of the most powerful witch on the Florida East Coast and the boy Dina had a crush on in grade school, arrives back in town....
"An enlightening peek into contemporary Native America."-Craig Stephen Smith (Ojibwe), Native American Evangelist, author of White Man's Gospel.
"A heart-thumping face-off between good and evil that will keep you in suspense until the very last page "-Dana K. Cassell, Writers-Editors Network.
"A courageous book that breaks new ground...a fascinating story by a new voice in Indian America."-Principal Chief William "Rattlesnake" Jackson, American Cherokee Confederacy.
"Native American Christians have long known what a struggle it is to live in two worlds, torn between traditional beliefs and the Christian faith. The characters in Gray Rainbow Journey speak for so many of us."-Betty Mae Jumper, Tribal Elder, Doctor of Humane Letters, author of Legends of the Seminoles Seminole Tribe of Florida, Inc.
"An exciting coming-of-age novel. I can definitely relate to this book's characters. I can't wait for the second book."-Carla McKay, Indian Life newspaper.(less)
Paperback, 300 pages

Published September 1st 2009 by Oaktara (first published July 1st 2008)
ISBN 1602902208 (ISBN13: 9781602902206)


MoonShineArtSpot's Opinion: by Lisa

I found this coming of age book very heart touching, and felt deeply for the young girl trying to find her place in the world. I had never considered the problems, especially religious, that the Native Americans still deal with today. Nor had I considered that their living conditions on or near reservations might not be as OK as I thought they were. You just don't hear much about the Indians in Mississippi any more unless it has to do with the casinos in mid Mississippi. I assumed they live pretty much as the white people today. I wish I did have more information about this and could possibly trace my own Indian ancestors. I knew that of course Indians were cheated out of their land and forced onto reservations. I know that as a part of history, but have seldom given thought to what they do and how they feel today. It is sad that I am little educated about it because I have a lot of Native American ancestors that I can not trace. My ancestors were Native American women who married white men, stayed in north Alabama and Mississippi, and were not accepted among the whites (this happened on both my father & mother's side of the family and my great grandmother would not even discuss her Indian mother because of the prejudice that she had suffered as a child). Considering that, when I try to find out who my great, great, grandmother or any of the other great, great, Indian grandmothers were, I run into a brick wall where my family is concerned because our elders would not discuss it because of prejudices at that time. Now that those of us who are proud of the heritage can not even get a NAME OR TRIBE name to start on our search.

I knew the Native Americans had a very hard time in the past, and I am very glad to have read this book to gain information about the struggles they still face today with religious choices vs. the old ways that their elders may feel that they are turning their back on if they go the "white man's way". Today, and since I was a child & my dad told me that we were part Indian and should be proud of that, I long to learn more about it. This book is not just for Indian loving people though. It has many points of view of many young women torn between what their society wants from them and something they have found they might want for themselves. Young women have many tough decisions and whether to follow old superstitions or family ways is common in most young girls (not just Native Americans).

This book was also a love story type with a strong young girl needing to find her own way, and not be lead by her boyfriend nor anyone else's beliefs. She, as all young girls, had to make her way though her family's ideas, her boyfriend's ideas, and her community's ideas to find what she needed form her own ideas to make herself whole and happy.

It is easy to be lead astray from your own beliefs by boyfriends, friends, family, or many others who think they are leading you in the right direction. Everyone, at some point in their life, needs to decide which path is best for them to follow in order to find their happiness.

This book is wonderful and full of hope for anyone!! I loved it.






View all my reviews

1 comment:

  1. Great review. This definitely sounds like a book I would like.

    I am Cherokee, but I'm having the same problems you are. I know my family is from the Cherokee reservation in North Carolina. My grandma lived there until she was five and then they left the reservation and moved to Pennsylvania. They also changed their name and so I don't know what their name was on the reservation. The traditions and culture was never passed on either.

    So I didn't grow up on the rez or around the culture, but I still consider myself Cherokee. It is part of who I am and I'm proud of my heritage.

    ReplyDelete

LISA'S REVIEW of The Pants Project by Cat Clark

        ****   LISA'S REVIEW OF    THE PANTS PROJECT   I was pleased to see this book in the Middle School age group. I...